I owe back taxes. Will I get a Coronavirus stimulus check?

April 23, 2020 by Karen Reed, EA
Man holding sign saying Stimulus Checks

Generally, the answer is yes. If you owe back taxes or have a payment agreement with the IRS, you will still receive a stimulus check if you are eligible to receive one – and the amount you receive will not be offset by your tax debt. At this time, only taxpayers whose past due child support payments have been reported by their state to the IRS will have their stimulus payments offset.

The IRS is issuing stimulus payments for the full amounts to single taxpayers who have adjusted gross incomes (AGI) below $75,000 and joint filers with incomes below $150,000. Single filers with incomes between $75,000 and $100,000 and joint filers with incomes between $150,000 and $198,000 will receive a reduced payment. Head of Household (HOH) filers with AGIs of up to $112,500 will receive the full payment, and the payment amount will be reduced for those with incomes between $112,500 and $136,500. These payments are an advance on a 2020 tax credit.

To find out the status of your payment and to learn more about the stimulus payments, please visit the IRS webpage dedicated to Coronavirus Tax Relief and Economic Impact Payments.

Please be cautious when seeking advice about stimulus payments. The best source for this information is the IRS. The IRS will not contact you by phone, email, or text regarding your stimulus payment. Please see the warning IRS has issued here.

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Karen Reed, EA
Director of Communications for TRIHoldCo

 

Karen Reed, EA, is the Director of Communications for TRIHoldCo. Inc., the parent company of TaxAudit and Centenal Tax Group. During her years as an audit representative for TaxAudit, she successfully defended the company’s members throughout the entire federal and state audit processes, handled cases assigned to US Tax Court, and developed procedures to make the audit process easier for taxpayers. Karen attributes a great deal of her tax acumen to the six tax seasons she spent as a return reviewer, analyzing thousands of returns. Responding in writing to questions from taxpayers, she became familiar with the common mistakes self-preparers make. Karen was previously the manager of the Tax Education and Research Department at TaxAudit. Her tax advice has been featured in U.S. News and World Report, the Los Angeles Times, the Chicago Tribune, and other publications.


 

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