It’s time to check your tax withholding!

September 01, 2017 by Charla Suaste
Tax WIthholding written in a notebook

September is upon us. School is starting, and most of us are gearing up for cooler weather, the upcoming holidays, and the fact that the rest of 2017 is going to fly by. With the short amount of days we have left in 2017, this is the perfect time to evaluate your tax situation and ensure that, come 2018, you’ll have no surprises when you file your tax return. This is especially important if you’ve faced any major life changes, such as getting married or divorced, buying or selling a home, changing jobs, starting school, or facing a natural disaster of any kind.
 

But even if you’ve had a seemingly run-of-the-mill year, even the smallest change can have an effect on your exemptions and credits. For this reason, take the time to evaluate your tax withholding now and make any necessary changes.

To make things easy, the IRS offers a number of resources to help you make sense of your withholding requirements, including YouTube videos and an online withholding calculator. If you find you do need to make withholding adjustments, be sure to visit your employer’s HR department and complete the necessary paperwork.
 

For additional information and resources on how to make your withholding work for you, visit IRS.gov.

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Charla Suaste
Communications Content Developer

 

Charla Suaste joined TaxAudit back in 2007 and, over the past 14 years, she has worked in a variety of different roles throughout the organization, including as a Customer Service Representative, Case Coordinator, and Administrative Services Assistant. She now serves as the Communications Content Developer and is passionate about writing, editing, and making even the most complex concepts easy to understand. Outside of work, Charla enjoys traveling, listening to podcasts, and spending time in her garden.


 

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